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Creativity Learnography Neuroscience

Use of ancient tools and fire was delivered by the cerebellar learnography of human brain

Learnogram, cyclozeid and learnograph are the three basic parts of human learnography. The cerebral cortex of brain acts as the learnogram of knowledge chapters. It prepares human brain to launch the brainpage theory of learning mechanism for knowledge transfer. Learning from brainpage development is crucial to the performance of school system. Cyclozeid is the second part of learnography that conducts the rehearsal practice of knowledge chapters to consolidate learning, memories and behavior. Basal ganglia, limbic system and hypothalamus launch the learning mechanism of cyclozeid to provide the efficient learning of goal oriented knowledge tasks. Brainstem and cerebellum play a vital role in the modulation of functional learnographs.

Students are often encouraged to learn professional skills to find suitable jobs for working and earning. Education is focused on the study of science and technology that will help to achieve advanced knowledge for creativity and innovation. So, school system must be based on the working mechanism of brain to provide goal oriented learning process in classroom. The use of tools and fire is the basic drive of ancient technology which is the most important factor of human civilization. The cerebellum of brain is responsible to utilize tools and equipments efficiently in working process.

Evolution of human intelligence is derived from the brain learnography of natural events, reactance and surrounding objects. Learning of human brain is transferred through the conventional teaching of education system. But knowledge is transferred into the different parts of brain and teaching theory is not suitable for the development of smart brainpage in classroom. In fact, there are three types of brain learnography – cortical learning, subcortical learning and cerebellar learning.

Cortical learning gives the matrix and spectrum of knowledge chapters that are essential to launch the learnogram of cognitive practice in cerebrum known as forebrain. Subcortical learning modulation encompasses the rehearsed mechanism of cyclozeid processing to promote structural and behavioral plasticity in learning process. Cerebellar learning coordinates the fine-tuning of cognitive thoughts and finger mapping, and required to the improvement of procedural knowledge.

For innovative learnography, it is essential to understand how sensory information is received in the stimulus centers of brain mechanism and how motor information can be transmitted to muscles. Together these two systems allow us to detect and respond to the world around us. This is the reactance theory of cognitive development. But we have to determine the system of knowledge transfer that will be important for fast learning, productive working and happy living.

Village learnography is the origin of modern science and technology in which tools were used to build shelters and fire for lighting or cooking food. By definition, a tool is any physical item that can be used to achieve a goal, especially if the item is not consumed in working process. Tools that are used in particular fields or activities may have different designations such as instrument, utensil, machine, device or apparatus. Tool development is the result of cerebellar learnography.

Set of tools needed to achieve a goal is defined as equipment. But technology is the knowledge of constructing, obtaining and using tools to describe the functions of structural objects. The use of tools and fire contributes to human culture and was key to the rise of civilization.

Some animals are also known to employ simple tools like chimpanzees do. The use of stone tools by humans dates back millions of years. More advanced tools, such as bow and arrow began to be developed approximately 20000 years ago.

Tools are the most important items that ancient humans used to climb to the top of the food chain. By inventing tools, they were able to accomplish tasks that human bodies could not, such as using a spear or bow and arrow to kill prey, since their teeth were not sharp enough to pierce many animals’ skins.

The way humans make and use tools is perhaps what sets our species apart more than anything else. Now scientists are more and more uncovering the forces that drove our lineage to our heights of tool use, in turn, might have influenced our evolution.

It’s true that tools are the product of our brain and we have millions of stone tools. What we need are more creative ideas on how to extract understanding from them, and what they tell us about our evolution.

Living in the computer driven information age, we don’t necessarily think of fire or tools as technologies. But by definition, technology refers to the practical application of knowledge in a certain area. Learning how to tame animals and use fire proved an invaluable technological advance in human development.

Learning how to sharpen a flint, attach a flint to a piece of wood to create a spear, then understanding how to use flint on other pieces of wood to create digging tools were all technological leaps in the cerebellar learnography of human civilization.

The earliest stone tool making skill of humans developed by at least 2.6 million years ago. The early stone age began with the most basic stone implements made by early humans. Set of these toolkits includes hammer stones, stone cores and sharp stone flakes. By about 1.76 million years ago, early humans began to make hand axes and other large cutting tools. By 200,000 years ago, the pace of innovation in stone technology began to accelerate. Middle stone age toolkits included points, which could be hafted on to shafts to make spears and stone awls. These tools could have been used to perforate hides and scrapers that were useful in preparing hide, wood and other materials.

Spanning the past 2.6 million years, many thousands of archeological sites have been excavated, studied and dated. These sites often consist of accumulated debris from making and using stone tools. Because stone tools are less susceptible to destruction than bones, stone artifacts typically offer the best evidence of where and when early humans lived, their geographic dispersal and their ability to survive in a variety of habitats. Most important is that stone tools provide evidence about technologies, dexterity, particular kinds of mental skills and innovations that were within the grasp of early human tool makers.

Learnogram, cyclozeid and learnograph are the three basic parts of human learnography. The cerebral cortex of brain acts as the learnogram of knowledge chapters. It prepares human brain to launch the brainpage theory of learning mechanism for knowledge transfer. Learning from brainpage development is crucial to the performance of school system.

Cyclozeid is the second part of learnography that conducts the rehearsal practice of knowledge chapters to consolidate learning, memories and behavior. Basal ganglia, limbic system and hypothalamus launch the learning mechanism of cyclozeid to provide the efficient learning of goal oriented knowledge tasks. Brainstem and cerebellum play a vital role in the modulation of functional learnographs.

Home : Learnography

Picture and Studies : Wikipedia

Resources :

  • Use of tools and fire in ancient civilization
  • Pathways of village learnography
  • Origin of science and technology
  • Stone age and working tools
  • Brain model of knowledge transfer

Shiva Narayan Jha
Principal
Golden Star Secondary School
Rajbiraj, Nepal

By Happiness Classroom

This is the school of knowledge transfer in which the learning fields of brainpage theory are launched in the classroom like the workplace of knowledge transfer. Teaching is not necessary because students learn from source books by applying the working dimensions of brain circuits. Everything is finished in school hours and homework is not required for practice. A classroom of small teachers is defined in school learnography to make high speed brainpage modules in book to brain learning transfer.

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